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Once your baby’s born, be prepared for lots of trips to the pediatrician. And not just those, “I think my daughter has a fever” trips; your regularly scheduled well visits. Here’s what you can expect during your baby’s first couple of years.

“These appointments are about more than just getting shots,” says Puthenmadam Radhakrishnan, MD, of Bellevue Pediatrics in Ewing. “It’s also about making sure baby’s doing well, gaining weight and meeting developmental milestones.” The doctor will assess your baby physically from head to toe—length, weight, the circumference and shape of baby’s head, potential soft spots, legs, hips, muscles, pulse, eyes, ears, skin, breathing and genitals. The doctor will also order blood tests to screen for metabolic disorders, plus look for early signs of autism.

“I also answer parents’ questions from breastfeeding issues to postpartum depression to childcare to sleep patterns,” says Radhakrishnan. “And we discuss family history, their newborn’s screenings and baby’s progress with developmental milestones such as rolling over, making sounds or interacting with people.” For a full list of milestones, visit the Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC) website at cdc.gov.

CHECKUP AND VACCINE SCHEDULE

Along with head-to-toe checkups, your baby will likely follow a schedule of vaccinations and screenings established by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Make sure you talk with your doctor about any concerns you have regarding vaccines. With measles on a record-breaking rise in the US, doctors say it’s crucial to make sure your baby stays on schedule with his vaccinations. Given the increase, you should ask your doctor if you need a measles booster, too.

WITHIN THE FIRST WEEK

  • Hepatitis B (HepB), 1st dose of three-dose series, if not given at hospital
  • Hearing test (continues through childhood)
  • Check hips, back, feet, ears, eyes, heart, pulse, umbilical stump, skin (for jaundice), reflexes, circumcision (if done), movement, blood pressure and blood oxygen levels

WITHIN THE FIRST MONTH

  • HepB, 2nd dose (between 1-2 months)
  • Tuberculosis (TB) test

2 MONTHS

  • Rotavirus (RV), 1st of two- or three-dose series
  • Diptheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP), 1st of four-dose series
  • Influenza type B (Hib), 1st of four-dose series
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13), 1st of four-dose series
  • Inactivated poliovirus (IPV), 1st of three-dose series

4 MONTHS

  • RV, 2nd dose
  • DTaP, 2nd dose
  • Hib, 2nd dose
  • PCV13, 2nd dose
  • IPV, 2nd dose

18 MONTHS

  • Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) screening
  • Blood test
  • Lead screening

24 MONTHS

  • LAIV (live attenuated, nasal spray substitute for Influenza IIV) annual vaccine, one- to two-dose series through childhood
  • ASD screening
  • Lead screening

6 MONTHS

  • HepB, 3rd dose (between 6-18 months)
  • RV, 3rd dose (if given a three-dose series)
  • DTaP, 3rd dose
  • Hib, 3rd dose
  • PCV13, 3rd dose
  • IPV 3rd dose, (between 6-18 months)
  • Influenza IIV (inactivated) annual vaccine, one- to two-dose series through childhood
  • TB test
  • Lead screening (also at 9 months)

12 MONTHS

  • Hib, 4th dose (between 12-15 months)
  • PCV13, 4th dose (between 12-15 months)
  • Mumps, measles and rubella (MMR), 1st of two-dose series (between 12-15 months)
  • Varicella (VAR), 1st of two-dose series (between 12-15 months)
  • Hepatitis A (HepA), 1st of two-dose series (between 12-23 months)
  • Lead screening
  • TB test

15 MONTHS

  • DTaP, 4th dose (between 15-18 months)

18 MONTHS

  • Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) screening
  • Blood test
  • Lead screening

24 MONTHS

  • LAIV (live attenuated, nasal spray substitute for Influenza IIV) annual vaccine, one- to two-dose series through childhood
  • ASD screening
  • Lead screening

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)