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In the days of COVID, experience matters. And Summer Explorations, the summer program at The Elisabeth Morrow School, has experience. It has the advantage of not only having run its program in summer 2020—but also having run both an in-person and virtual school year, too. “We’ve gained the experience of what it looks like to have students in the building and the use of space,” said Director of Auxiliary Programs Liza Jones Hards. “We have HEPA filtration in all classrooms and buildings. In addition, we have a beautiful 14-acre campus that we’ve utilized to get students outside and make great use of that resource.”

EXCEEDING SAFETY GUIDELINES

Summer Explorations plans to be open for six weeks for children ages 2 to grade 8, with half- and full-day options. Specialized theme weeks will be offered to preschoolers up to first-graders, with outdoor activities and creative projects. For grades 2-6, choices including science, art, technology, creative writing, theater, music and nature exploration will be offered. The oldest students, in grades 7-9, will have leadership programs and academic classes in science, writing, technology, math and test prep. The campus encompasses two state-of-the-art science and technology labs, two outdoor playgrounds and a new turf field. Safety protocols are in place–and evolving as often as necessary, Hards says.

“We aim to meet and exceed all of the CDC guidelines,” she adds. “We have a team of doctors and medical professionals that have helped us to look over our protocols and our policies to make sure that we are maintaining the highest standards that are coming across, as they change daily.”

A SHARED SPIRIT, 6 FEET APART

Hards says Elisabeth Morrow has long focused on preventing what she calls the “summer slide,” the phenomenon where students take a summer break without education and lose the momentum of the academic year. That mission has only become more important as many students have had only remote learning for the past year.

“The best way that they’re going to be able to learn is to be able to come together in a safe way,” Hards adds. “The communication and working together with someone can’t really be replicated over the screen. There are lots that can, and we’ve had a successful remote program, as well, but there’s a sense of excitement that comes from working together with someone, even if you’re six feet apart.”

435 Lydecker St., Englewood
201-568-5566, ext. 7333
elisabethmorrow.org

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