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Whether your kid can’t wait to start a new school year or is dreading it, there are a few things you can do to make the transition easier for everyone. Follow these tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Ophthalmology for a healthy start to the year:

SEE YOUR PEDIATRICIAN 

Schedule a visit with your child’s pediatrician. Ask about immunizations, boosters and sports-specific exams required for kids before they can begin an athletics program.

TALK TO THE SCHOOL NURSE 

If your child has health conditions, such as asthma or food allergies, make sure the school’s nurses are aware. Discuss medications and how they will be dispensed if your child needs them during the school day.

SCHEDULE A DENTAL CHECKUP

Make an appointment ASAP If your child is overdue for a checkup or cleaning. Kids should also have custom-fit mouthguards made if they participate in sports, especially if they have braces.

GET A COMPREHENSIVE EYE EXAM 

Kids should have their vision screened in first grade and annually thereafter. The exam should check for visual acuity and eye diseases. Ask your kid’s eye doctor about protective eyewear if your child participates in sports with a high risk for eye injury, such as basketball or lacrosse.

ENCOURAGE KIDS TO LESSEN THEIR LOAD 

Carrying a backpack that’s too heavy is a common cause of back pain for kids. Limit the weight to less than 10 pounds and make sure they’re wearing it across their backs, not slung over one shoulder. A rolling backpack is another option.

GET BACK ON TRACK WITH SLEEP 

Gradeschoolers need about 10 to 12 hours of sleep per night, while teens need about 8 to 10 hours. Getting into a healthy sleep routine at least a week before school starts will help to ensure a smoother transition.

REHEARSE THE FIRST DAY 

If your child seems anxious about starting a new grade or going to a new school, do a walk-through to help familiarize them with the routine. Ask about touring the classroom or meeting the teacher ahead of time. Help them troubleshoot ways of handling whatever is worrying them. Talk about the fun parts of school, too, such as seeing old friends or getting to pick out new school supplies.

DEAL WITH ANXIETY 

While a little nervousness is normal, watch for red flags that your child isn’t coping well with a return to school. Signs they may need help include changes in eating habits, sleep issues, isolating or frequent emotional outbursts, even headaches and stomachaches. Reach out to the school counselor, your pediatrician, or through HR at your workplace, which may have an employee assistance program (EAP), for mental health support.