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Warning Signs of Heat Stroke


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Did you know heat illness during sports practice or competition is the leading cause of death among US high school athletes, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC)?

Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition that happens when the body’s core temperature gets dangerously high from too much physical activity. It typically occurs in hot weather, but can strike anytime. Muscle cramping can be a first sign of heat-related illness that can lead to heat stroke. Symptoms also include heavy sweating, cold skin, fast pulse, nausea, vomiting and fainting. 

The good news: Safety guidelines adopted in 2011 in NJ are credited with preventing preseason high school football deaths. The guidelines were developed to help student athletes gradually get used to playing in the heat. Research findings were part of a study presented at the National Athletic Trainers’ Association meeting in 2016. The study reviewed 48 high school football preseasons in 14 states including NJ that adopted heat stroke prevention guidelines.

It’s never too early to protect your kids in hot weather no matter what sport they play. To prevent heat stroke, the guidelines suggest they only practice once a day for no more than three hours.

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