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Old Car Seats Sitting In Your Garage? Recycle Them at Target!

Donate yours at any Target store between April 17-30


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Photo courtesy of Target
 

Earth Day is right around the corner, which may mean you've been thinking about ways to help the planet, or maybe doing some spring cleaning. Either way, Target's car seat trade couldn't have come at a better time. If you have used car seats laying around your house, you won't want to miss this recycling event. 

Bring an old car seat into your local target and snag a coupon for 20% off any car seat (valid both in-store and online) that's good through May 31. An upgrade doesn't get any easier than that, folks. Best part? Your old car seat will be recycled or upcycled into a new product thanks to TerraCycle, an innovative company that recycles the "non-recyclable." This initiative should keep some 700,000 pounds of old car seats out of landfills. 

Of the millions of car seats American parents buy every year, tons of them end up being thrown away or collecting dust in our attics. Unfortunately, a lot of donation centers don't (or can't) accept old car seats due to how difficult they are to manually strip down, as well as the impossibility of knowing how safe or old a seat truly is.

Thanks to Target, getting rid of her old car digs—and scoring affordable new ones—is easier than ever. 

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