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Music Education Improves School Performance


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music educationEvery parent knows that making music can be one of a child’s favorite activities. But did you know that musically trained kids also perform significantly better on a variety of intelligence tests—including math, reading, vocabulary, memory, general IQ, and more? That means engaging your children with music at a very young age will not only bring them joy in the moment, it will also nurture a love of music that may encourage them to participate in band, chorale, and orchestra when they’re older, potentially giving them a leg up on the competition.

Here are some ways to get your child involved with music before he even knows what a quarter-note is. These easy crafts allow you and your child to explore sound, rhythm, language, and world cultures. Almost everything described here is made from recycled materials, so while you’re having fun, your child will be learning, and you’ll be saving money and the planet at the same time. 

Learn how to make your own instruments with some around-the-house items—>

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