6 Things to Stop Doing for Your Teen Right This Second

Stop the madness!



 

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We know, you look at your gangly teenager but see a little toddler, and all you want to do is help. But treating him like a 3-year-old isn’t going to do him any favors in the real world. If you really want to help your teen grow into a functional adult, it's time to let him tackle more things on his own. And let's be honest: You're probably really tired of doing everything for him anyway. Letting him take on more responsibility is a win-win.

DON’T BE HIS ALARM CLOCK

Your 15-year-old is more than capable of setting the alarm on his phone. You don’t need to go in his room and scream that he’s going to miss the bus. If he's late and has to walk to school, that’s on him.

DON’T MAKE HIS LUNCH

Let him make his own breakfast and lunch, and try not to cringe when he eats cereal and cold pizza every day. Better yet, teach him to cook a few staples like grilled cheese, scrambled eggs or pasta with veggies so he’ll get an actual meal if you're stuck working late.

DON’T DROP HER STUFF OFF AT SCHOOL

If she’s been playing the viola since fourth grade, she should remember to bring it on band practice days. Same goes for homework. You don’t need to check her backpack nightly or remind her that she’s got a big project due. Forgetting stuff and coping with the consequences is the best way to learn. And there are tons of reminder apps for her phone that can help if she’s a forgetful kid.

DON’T DO HER LAUNDRY

She does every sport under the sun and has uniforms and workout clothes that need to be washed constantly. That means she can figure out how to throw a detergent pod in the washer so you don’t have to deal with smelly jerseys.

DON’T JUST HAND OUT CASH

Whether he has a part-time job or you give him an allowance, he should learn to handle his personal finances by high school. Figuring out how to live within a budget, instead of just viewing you as a bottomless ATM, is an invaluable life skill.

DON’T DO THE TALKING FOR HER

One of the biggest things potential employers look for are “soft skills,” one of which is knowing how to look people in the eye and have an engaging conversation. Have her order her own food at restaurants and let her answer the questions when she goes to the doctor.